Don’t Forget The Climate

With politics being so horrendous at the moment, I do worry that some of the BIG issues are taking a backseat. Liz Truss has stepped down and we yet again have a vacancy for a new Prime Minister. All of this squabbling is stopping us progressing with many important matters, including global warming.

Energy is widely spoken about as expensive but we need to remember that current sources of energy are largely polluting. We must ensure that our concentration turns in the direction of making us energy efficient and self-sufficient.

At the same time, high temperatures of around 18 degrees in October is definitely unusual. Daily averages used to be around 10 degrees but we are now seeing warmer, wetter days. All we see on the News is bickering. What we should be seeing on the News is discussion about how we are going to reverse global warming.

This was just a quick reminder that CLIMATE CHANGE is still happening. While leaders argue over tax for millionaires, the world is in trouble.

Polar bears and seals are losing their habitats. People in Pakistan have lost their homes in floods. Forest fires have wreaked havoc once again in America. The situation is definitely worsening.

I hope that we can soon get back to dealing with the things that really matter.

Global Warming Affects Our Lives – Fact!

The Climate Change Collective of bloggers

I had a political morning today, meeting one of the UK Prime Minister candidates, where I was able to ask him about environmental policies. Just as I left that meeting, I was happy to see the first post from our brand new ‘Climate Change Collective’ group of bloggers. Brilliant!

Michelle and I originally had a conversation about creating a group for bloggers who wanted to write about climate change from our different perspectives and ensure it remained at the top of readers’ minds. It is great to see we already have a buzzing group willing to get involved and I cannot wait to see what each writer has to say.

Here is the very first article which focusses on how climate change is gradually affecting our daily lives:

Welcome To The Climate Change Collective:

My thoughts…

For me, as a geographer, I have always found it hard to convince people that global warming should matter to them and their lives. Michelle has cleverly outlined how it will specifically affect the retirement industry and discussed the impact air pollution is already having on health.

I look at the very flat Fenland area of agricultural land and market towns that is near where I live and worry about its vulnerability. Britain had a record 40 degrees C day in July, which was predicted to happen in twenty years or so. Meteorologists suggest that their initial timeline is redundant as warming has happened much faster than predicted.

If glacial melting is increasing in a feedback loop which is quite unstable, then the Fens could be under water within the next 30 years, as they were centuries ago, prior to drainage. This would destroy homes and demolish one of the largest arable farming patches in Europe.

That would have a massive impact on my life and the lives of many others. There are so many complex aspects to discuss but I do think people have woken up more to climate education, especially after recent turbulent weather occurrences around the world and a drought in the UK. Let’s hope we can bring environmental concerns to the top of government interests.

We can make a difference by urging politicians to invest in renewable energy and make the transport infrastructure much better. I hope that you have time to check out Michelle’s first post and join in with the conversation about climate change and how it is affecting all of us.

Take Aways From The Heatwave

This week the UK saw its hottest temperatures since records began. An average July used to see temperatures topping at 23 degrees Celsius but this week we peaked just above 40 degrees, which would have been unthinkable when I was growing up. Working in such hot conditions without air conditioning was really difficult. If this is going to be the new norm, we have to change the way we do things.

With meteorologists now predicting a further ‘heat dome’ over Europe in August and the extension of hot weather into September (which has been apparent for the past few years), the time has come to think carefully about how we ready ourselves for such hot weather.

My thoughts…

Yes, in Southern Europe they are used to having very hot days, but they are also closed during peak sunshine hours for a siesta. As well as this, their homes are painted white colours to reflect the sun and have shutters on the outside of their windows to block out the damaging rays. Air conditioning is part of their strategy too. In Britain our homes are designed to trap hot air. We have double glazed windows and extra insulation which make things worse.

Governments need to start thinking about working conditions during such hot periods. Perhaps they will consider:

– funding air conditioning for key workers and hospitals as well as subsidising this for low income households

– making affordable shutters an option to darken houses during hot days and reduce internal temperatures

– adapting school days to suit the weather (perhaps starting earlier and closing at midday or having a siesta)

However…

I notice that President Biden has set aside 2 billion dollars for air conditioning and sun protection. This is great but I hope he and other governments are putting even more money into finding ways to counter the effects of global warming.

The following things need addressing right away:

– ensuring all power stations use renewable energy supplies such as wind, hydro or solar

– funding a better network of trains and buses to reduce the amount of traffic on the roads

-taxing and discouraging frequent flying and overuse of aeroplanes

– widespread tree planting schemes and re-wilding

Hopefully some lessons have been learned from this week’s heatwave. It would be sad to see no changes taking place, given this massive wake up call. We all know that climate change will become more of a problem over the next few decades. We really need to act now to protect our homes, our health and our crops. Thank you for reading my article. If you enjoyed it, please consider following my blog for similar future content.